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Cautions and Safety

The Colon Cleansing Kit™ is a safe process used by tens of thousands of satisfied customers. There are some conditions and drugs that make it inadvisable to use and others that require the guidance of a healthcare practitioner to monitor your condition and/or adjust your drug dosage as needed. Please read the following information carefully.

Do NOT Use if:
  • • you are pregnant, trying to get pregnant or nursing
  • • you become pregnant, stop the cleanse immediately
  • • you have an active, acute infection anywhere in the body
  • • you are undergoing/recovering from a medical procedure, surgery or therapy
  • • you have extreme weakness or extreme deficiencies
  • • you have abdominal pain, abnormal narrowing of esophagus or intestines, an acute inflammation of the GI tract, bowel obstruction, diarrhea, or vomiting
  • • you have trouble swallowing
Additional General Guidelines

As a general rule of thumb, we recommend that you don't take any other herbs, supplements, vitamins, OTC drugs or recreational drugs, while you are cleansing. Cleansing is an opportunity for the body to clean house; the less added to your diet, the more efficient the cleansing. If, however, you intuitively feel you need to keep taking them, please follow your intuition, your own personal guide for what's best for you.

If you are taking a prescription drug temporarily, please finish its course before starting your cleanse.

If your prescription drug is needed on an everyday, ongoing basis, please look over the safety information first. You will find cautions for some drugs that may make cleansing prohibitive for you and other drugs that you may continue to take, but will need to do so two hours apart from taking any formula of the cleansing kits.

If you must take your prescription more than once a day, you will only be able to do the GOOD Option of the Colon Cleansing Kit™ as it is the only option that provides enough time between taking formulas of the kit and your prescription to avoid absorption or interaction with the drug.

Taking Toxin Absorber™ without enough liquid may cause choking or constipation. If you experience chest pain, vomiting, allergic skin rash or difficulty in swallowing or breathing after taking Toxin Absorber™, seek immediate medical attention.

The Following Conditions and Drugs May Interact With
the Colon Cleansing Kit™

This information is not limited to only these conditions and drugs listed below, as not all conditions and drugs have been tested or observed with herbs. However, people with these conditions and taking these drugs have safely used our cleansing kits. This may not be true though for every individual. Before deciding if our kits are safe for you, please read carefully any of the following information that may apply to your unique situation. Discontinue if adverse effects occur.

CONDITIONS Affected by the Colon Cleansing Kit


Blocked Gallbladder/Gallstone Conditions

Barberry root, Dandelion root, Fringe Tree root bark, Ginger root, Peppermint leaf should only be used under the close supervision of a healthcare practitioner due to their contracting effect on the gallbladder and stimulation of bile.
These herbs are found in: Digestive Stimulator™, Toxin Absorber™


Diabetes

Licorice root, at high doses, may cause low potassium in the blood or sodium/fluid retention. A high dose is considered to be over 100 mg/day of glycyrrhizin content; especially if taken long term. The glycyrrhizin content of the Licorice root, found in Digestive Stimulator™, is less than 0.6 milligrams (mg) per capsule a day. Even at a maximum dose of 10 capsules/day, the glycyrrhizin content does not exceed 6 mg/day. Ask your healthcare practitioner if this low level of glycyrrhizin in the Licorice root is safe for you to take.
Licorice root is found in: Digestive Stimulator™

Psyllium seed husks may necessitate reducing your current dosage level of insulin. Consult your healthcare practitioner for monitoring.
Psyllium seed husks are found in: Toxin Absorber™

Note: If you have Type I or Type II diabetes and are insulin dependent, you need the approval and direct supervision of your healthcare practitioner to do the BEST Option of the Colon Cleansing Kit™, which requires liquids-only fasting or the BETTER Option, with maximum fiber. The GOOD Option would be alright for you to do provided you remain aware of your unique needs.

If you have Type II diabetes and are not insulin dependent, you need the approval and direct supervision of your healthcare practitioner to do the BEST Option, which requires liquids-only fasting. The BETTER Option and the GOOD Option would be alright for you to do provided you remain aware of your unique needs.


Heart Disease

Licorice root, at high doses, may cause low potassium, sodium/fluid retention, hypertension or a mineralcorticoid effect. A high dose is considered to be over 100 mg/day of glycyrrhizin content; especially if taken long term. The glycyrrhizin content of the Licorice root, found in Digestive Stimulator™, is less than 0.6 milligrams (mg) per capsule a day. Even at a maximum dose of 10 capsules/day, the glycyrrhizin content does not exceed 6 mg/day. Ask your healthcare practitioner if this low level of glycyrrhizin in the Licorice root is safe for you to take.
Licorice root is found in: Digestive Stimulator™


Hiatal Hernia

Peppermint leaf may cause more acid refluxing due to a relaxing effect on the lower esophageal sphincter. The amount of Peppermint leaf in Digestive Stimulator™ is very low; less than 4 milligrams (mg) per capsule and is not likely to cause problems. The amount of Peppermint leaf in Peppermint Toxin Absorber™ is larger and may cause a relaxing effect.
Peppermint leaf is found in: Digestive Stimulator™, Peppermint Toxin Absorber™

As a safe alternative, you may choose the Ginger Colon Cleansing Kit™.


High Blood Pressure

Licorice root, at high doses, may cause hypertension, or sodium/fluid retention. A high dose is considered to be over 100 mg/day of glycyrrhizin content; especially if taken long term. The glycyrrhizin content of the Licorice root, found in Digestive Stimulator™, is less than 0.6 milligrams (mg) per capsule a day. Even at a maximum dose of 10 capsules/day, the glycyrrhizin content does not exceed 6 mg/day. Ask your healthcare practitioner if this low level of glycyrrhizin in the Licorice root is safe for you to take.
Licorice root is found in: Digestive Stimulator™


Hypoglycemia

The BEST Option of the Colon Cleansing Kit™, which requires fasting on liquids, may throw off you blood sugar balance and you are advised to do the BEST Option only under the approval and direct supervision of your healthcare practitioner.

Both the BETTER Option and the GOOD Option would be alright for you to do, provided you continue to be aware of your unique dietary needs and maintain a balanced, whole foods diet while cleansing.


Hypokalemia

Licorice root, at high doses, may cause low potassium levels. A high dose is considered to be over 100 mg/day of glycyrrhizin content; especially if taken long term. The glycyrrhizin content of the Licorice root, found in Digestive Stimulator™, is less than 0.6 milligrams (mg) per capsule a day. Even at a maximum dose of 10 capsules/day, the glycyrrhizin content does not exceed 6 mg/day. Ask your healthcare practitioner if this low level of glycyrrhizin in the Licorice root is safe for you to take.
Licorice root is found in: Digestive Stimulator™


Kidney Disease

Licorice root, at high doses, may affect the potassium, sodium, or fluid retention levels in the body. A high dose is considered to be over 100 mg/day of glycyrrhizin content; especially if taken long term. The glycyrrhizin content of the Licorice root, found in Digestive Stimulator™, is less than 0.6 milligrams (mg) per capsule a day. Even at a maximum dose of 10 capsules/day, the glycyrrhizin content does not exceed 6 mg/day. Ask your healthcare practitioner if this low level of glycyrrhizin in the Licorice root is safe for you to take.
Licorice root is found in: Digestive Stimulator™


Liver Disease

Licorice root, at high doses, may cause low potassium, sodium/fluid retention, hypertension or a mineralcorticoid effect. A high dose is considered to be over 100 mg/day of glycyrrhizin content; especially if taken long term. The glycyrrhizin content of the Licorice root, found in Digestive Stimulator™, is less than 0.6 milligrams (mg) per capsule a day. Even at a maximum dose of 10 capsules/day, the glycyrrhizin content does not exceed 6 mg/day. Ask your healthcare practitioner if this low level of glycyrrhizin in the Licorice root is safe for you to take.
Licorice root is found in: Digestive Stimulator™


Very Constipated

Some people are very constipated and experience a lot of intestinal discomforts. If this is true for you, you may not be quite ready to begin the Colon Cleansing Kit™. You will need instead, to begin with our comfortable Regularity Support Pak A™, which includes three bottles of Digestive Stimulator™ followed by the Colon Cleansing Kit™ for those who are very constipated. See Are You Constipated? for more information.


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DRUG INTERACTIONS with the Colon Cleansing Kit


Anticoagulants, Antiplatelets and Aspirin

Ginger root, at high doses, may increase the risk of bleeding when combined with any of these drugs due to its blood thinning effect. Until conclusive evidence is available, exercise caution and have your healthcare practitioner monitor your INR values to prove there is no increased chance of bleeding for you. Research studies in humans show that fresh, but not dried Ginger root (dried root only is used in the Colon Cleansing Kit™) may increase the blood thinning effect of anticoagulant drugs. This effect may also be dose dependent, as one study with humans showed that it took 10 grams of dried Ginger root to have a blood thinning effect; whereas 4 grams of dried Ginger root taken for 3 months had no such effect. A dose of Ginger as used for spicing food is not a problem. One cap of Digestive Stimulator™ has less than 14 mg of Ginger root, which would be considered a "spice dose" even at the maximum dose of upwards to 10 caps of Digestive Stimulator™/day that would be less than 140 mg or less than 1/8 teaspoon which would still be considered a "spice dose".
Ginger root is found in: Digestive Stimulator™, Ginger Toxin Absorber™

You may alternately choose the Peppermint Colon Cleansing Kit™ to reduce your intake of dried Ginger root to "spice consumption" levels.


Antihypertensives

Licorice root, at high doses, may decrease the effect of the drug and cause hypertension, or sodium/fluid retention. A high dose is considered to be over 100 mg/day of glycyrrhizin content; especially if taken long term. The glycyrrhizin content of the Licorice root, found in Digestive Stimulator™, is less than 0.6 milligrams (mg) per capsule a day. Even at a maximum dose of 10 capsules/day, the glycyrrhizin content does not exceed 6 mg/day. Ask your healthcare practitioner if this low level of glycyrrhizin in the Licorice root is safe for you to take.
Licorice root is found in: Digestive Stimulator™


Corticosteroids

Licorice root, at high doses, may increase the effect of the drug. A high dose is considered to be over 100 mg/day of glycyrrhizin content; especially if taken long term. The glycyrrhizin content of the Licorice root, found in Digestive Stimulator™, is less than 0.6 milligrams (mg) per capsule a day. Even at a maximum dose of 10 capsules/day, the glycyrrhizin content does not exceed 6 mg/day. Ask your healthcare practitioner if this low level of glycyrrhizin in the Licorice root is safe for you to take.
Licorice root is found in: Digestive Stimulator™


Diuretic Drugs

Licorice root, at high doses, may increase the effect of the drug and cause excessive potassium loss. A high dose is considered to be over 100 mg/day of Glycyrrhizin content; especially if taken long term. The glycyrrhizin content of the Licorice root, found in Digestive Stimulator™, is less than 0.6 milligrams (mg) per capsule a day. Even at a maximum dose of 10 capsules/day, the glycyrrhizin content does not exceed 6 mg/day. Ask your healthcare practitioner if this low level of glycyrrhizin in the Licorice root is safe for you to take.
Licorice root is found in: Digestive Stimulator™



Drug Absorption/Interactions For Any Oral Drug/Supplement

Any Oral Drug/Supplement should be taken at least two hours before or after taking a dose of Toxin Absorber™ so its highly absorptive power will not diminish the effectiveness of the drug/supplement. Digestive Stimulator™ should also be taken two hours apart from any drug/supplement, to lessen the possibility of any interactions.


Heart Drugs

Licorice root, at high doses, may increase the effect of the drug and thereby its toxicity. A high dose is considered to be over 100 mg/day of glycyrrhizin content; especially if taken long term. The glycyrrhizin content of the Licorice root, found in Digestive Stimulator™, is less than 0.6 milligrams (mg) per capsule a day. Even at a maximum dose of 10 capsules/day, the glycyrrhizin content does not exceed 6 mg/day. Ask your healthcare practitioner if this low level of glycyrrhizin in the Licorice root is safe for you to take.
Licorice root is found in: Digestive Stimulator™


Insulin

Psyllium seed husks may necessitate reducing your current dosage level of insulin. Consult your healthcare practitioner for monitoring.
Psyllium seed husks are found in: Toxin Absorber™

Note: If you have Type I or Type II diabetes and are insulin dependent, you need the approval and direct supervision of your healthcare practitioner to do the BEST Option of the Colon Cleansing Kit™, which requires liquids-only fasting or the BETTER Option, with maximum fiber. The GOOD Option would be alright for you to do provided you remain aware of your unique needs.

If you have Type II diabetes and are not insulin dependent, you need the approval and direct supervision of your healthcare practitioner to do the BEST Option, which requires liquids-only fasting. The BETTER Option and the GOOD Option would be alright for you to do provided you remain aware of your unique needs.



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Safety References

Humans have been taking herbs safely for thousands of years and drugs for the last hundred or so years and only recently have we begun to take both of them together. There is no complete and exhaustive scientific research that describes how these two interact. This is a work in progress. Some of the most popular herbs and commonly taken drugs do now have some record of how they interact and we share that information with you.

Herbal safety knowledge comes from four main sources; empirical use, databases, scientific journals, and books. As in anything in life, both false and true statements can be found in any of these sources. There are two main views that predominate in the literature. One that leans to the living and actual, holistic experience of herbs and the other to a reductionistic understanding of isolated chemicals. Each view has something to contribute. Holding them up together, in order to learn from both, allows one to have the best of both views. In presenting the safety information for the Cleansing Kits, we have tried to do just that for you.

Most Highly Recommended References:
  • The Essential Guide to Herbal Safety
    Simon Mills & Kerry Bone, 2005

  • AHPA Botanical Safety Handbook
    Michael McGuffin, 1997

  • The ABC Clinical Guide to Herbs
    Mark Blumenthal, 2003

  • CRC Handbook of Medicinal Herbs, 2nd ed.
    James A. Duke, 2002

  • Herb Contraindications & Drug Interactions
    Francis Brinker & Nancy Stodart, 2001

Complete List of Safety References

Auf'mkolk, M. et al. 1984. Antihormonal effects of plant extracts: Iodothyronine deiodinase of rat liver is inhibited by extracts and secondary metabolites of plants. Horm Metabol Res. 16:188-192

Blumenthal, M. et al, eds. 2003. The ABC Clinical Guide to Herbs. Austin, TX: American Botanical Council

Blumenthal, M. et al, eds. 1998. The Complete German Commission E Monographs. Boston, MA: Integrative Medicine Communications

Bordia, A. et al. 1997. Effect of ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc) and fenugreek (Trigonella foenumgraecum L) on blood lipids, blood sugar, and platelet aggregation in patients with coronary artery disease. Prostagland Leukotrienes Essential Fatty Acids 56(5):379-384

Bradley, P.R., ed. 1992. British Herbal Compendium, volume 1. Dorset: British Herbal Medicine Association

Brinker, F. 2001. Herb Contraindications & Drug Interactions. 3rd ed. Sandy, OR: Eclectic Medical Publications

Brinker, FJ. 1990. Inhibition of endocrine function by botanical agents I. Boraginaceae and Labiatae. J. Naturop. Med. 1:10-18

Brinker, F. 2000. The Toxicology of Botanical Medicines. 3rd ed. Sandy, OR: Eclectic Medical Publications

De Smet, P.A.G.M. et al., eds. 1993. Adverse Effects of Herbal Drugs 2. Berlin: Springer-Verlag

Duke, J.A. 2002. CRC Handbook of Medicinal Herbs. 2nd ed. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press

Felter, H.W. and J. U. Lloyd. 1898. King's American Dispensatory. 18th ed. 3rd rev. 3rd printing 1993. Sandy, OR: Eclectic Medical Publishers

Gaby, A.R. et al, eds. 2006. A-Z Guide to Drug-Herb-Vitamin Interactions. 2nd ed. New York: Three Rivers Press

Janssen, PL. et al. 1996. Consumption of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) does not affect ex vivo platelet thromboxane production in humans. Eur J Clin Nutr 50(11):772-774

Jellin, JM. et al, eds. 2006. Pharmacist's Letter/Prescriber's Letter Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. 8th ed. Stockton, CA: Therapeutic Research Faculty

Jones, K. 1995. Cat's Claw: Healing Vine of Peru. Seattle: Sylvan Press

Kruth, P. et al. 2004. Ginger-associated overanticoagulation by phenprocoumon. Ann Pharmacother 38:257-60

Kuhn, MA. 2002. Herbal remedies: Drug- herb interactions. Crit Care Nurse 22(2):22-32

Lumb, AB. 1994. Effect of dried ginger on human platelet function. Thromb Haemost 71(1):110-1

Mason, R. 2001. Chlorella and Spirulina. Alternative & Complementary Therapies. 7 (3): 161-165

McGuffin, M. et al, eds. 1997. AHPA Botanical Safety Handbook. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press

Mills, S. and K. Bone. 2005. The Essential Guide to Herbal Safety. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier, Inc.

Mills, S. and K. Bone. 2000. Principles and Practice of Phytotherapy. reprinted 2001. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone

Mowrey, DB. 1986. The Scientific Validation of Herbal Medicine. Toronto:Cormorant Books

Newall, C.A. et al. 1996. Herbal Medicines: A Guide for Health-care Professionals. reprinted 1997. London: The Pharmaceutical Press

PDR, eds. 2004. DR for Herbal Medicines. 3rd ed. Montvale, NJ: Thomson PDR

Peirce, A. 1999. The APhA Practical Guide to Natural Medicines. New York: Stonesong Press, Wm. Morrow & Co, Inc.

PTINR.com Staff. December 1, 2006. Vitamin K - A new perspective. http://www.ptinr.com/data/templates/article.aspx?a=543&z=3

Schulick, P. 1996. Ginger: Common Spice & Wonder Drug. 3rd ed. Brattleboro, VT: Herbal Free Press

Skidmore-Roth, L. 2004. Mosby's Handbook of Herbs & Natural Supplements. 2nd ed. St. Louis, MO: Mosby

Sourgens, H. et al. 1982. Antihormonal effects of plant extracts: TSH- and Prolactin- suppressing properties of Lithospermum officinale and other plants. Planta Med. 45:78-86

Taylor, L. 2005. The Healing Power of Rainforest Herbs. Garden City Park, NY: Square One Publishers

Tisserand, R. and T. Balacs. 1995. Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone

Wichtl, M. and N.G. Bisset, eds. 1994. Herbal Drugs and Phytopharmaceuticals. Stuttgart: Medpharm GmbH Scientific Publishers

the Colon Cleansing Kit™
 

  • the Colon Cleansing Kit™

    Everything you need for a safe, effective colon cleanse.

    Options:
    Regular Price: $89.50
    Qty:  

    If you are in need of a colon cleanser that contains all-natural and organic ingredients, try the Blessed Herbs Colon Cleansing Kit™. This colon cleansing product comes with the Digestive Stimulator™, Toxin Absorber™, shaker jar, user's guide as well as a handy dosage calendar.

    If you have any questions, check out our FAQ section, or contact us.

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